Making Social Media Work for QSRs

Posted on January 27, 2009. Filed under: Customer Insight Portal, Leximancer, News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Time and time again we’ve stressed the importance of both listening and responding to social media conversations. We’ve highlighted how companies like Dunkin Donuts, W Hotel, Apple and others are missing huge customer intelligence opportunities by not truly acting on the wealth of unstructured insight available via social media sites on the Web. What this information can give companies – quickly and easily – is a gold mine of customer insight.

QSR Magazine agrees, and in a recent article featuring Leximancer’s The Customer Insight Portal and CEO Neil Hartley, discussed the importance of these social media sites and their customer conversations for quick service restaurants. Using Yelp, Twitter, BooRah, etc., quick service restaurants can uncover actionable and invaluable customer insight that they can act upon accordingly.

To read the full article, click here.

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Comcastic Reviews on Twitter, Consumerist and Pissed Consumer

Posted on October 21, 2008. Filed under: Customer Insight Portal | Tags: , , , |

Comcast made a renewed commitment to customer service and quality earlier this year. There is no doubt that Comcast is working hard with the launch of Frank Eliason’s customer service team. Through their efforts, the team has made great strides in helping to quell customer dissatisfaction and to end sites such as ComcastMustDie.com.

While there’s no doubt Comcast’s social media efforts are making inroads in handling customer service complaints, analyzing three Web sites – Twitter, Consumerist and Pissed Consumer – gives insight into the current Comcast customer pulse. For Consumerist and Pissed Consumer, Leximancer analyzed data for the last six weeks and for Twitter analyzed data for the last five days. The immense amount of data available in such a short time made us appreciate how much information Frank’s team is currently dealing with.

So what is current sentiment for according to these three sites?

Conceptual Map Analyzing Feedback on Comcast for Twitter, Pissed Consumer and Consumerist

Conceptual Map Analyzing Feedback on Comcast for Twitter, Pissed Consumer and Consumerist

As Comcast, the first disconcerting themes are sucks and Comcast Sucks. For a company striving hard to improve its customer service and quality issues, these raise red flags that they have more work to do. The Customer Insight Portal allows users to drill down into specific feedback helping detect the root cause of why Comcast customers are communicating such negative sentiment.

Feedback included:

“The last one somewhere in India asked me once again to turn on my TV to check for a signal, when I said i would not do It as I have no signal he was confused and said “But sir we must follow procedure.” I asked him to enter into his computer that Comcast procedure sucks, and thanked him for his time at a very high decibel level.”
“We can just chalk this up to reason # 14,865,739,547,883,953,001 why Comcast sucks (sic).”

“comcast sucks. . don’t become a customer.”

“I have comcast, It sucks pretty bad, I have to reset my router every week”
“Comcast – specifically Comcast in Philadelphia, is the worst run company I have encountered.”

Comcastcares Shows Up Prominently

Comcastcares Shows Up Prominently

Since The Customer Insight Portal allows you to tag your sources of data, you can see the files Comcast Pissed Consumer, Twitter and Consumerist. On the plus side for Comcast, note how “comcastcares,” the official Comcast Twitter account, shows up as a theme close to the Twitter file showing that Frank and his team are frequently helping to address concerns on Twitter. The term comcastshares shows up 169 times, which is a significant number showing how frequently the official account is being addressed.

Pathway Analysis Showing Correlation Between Comcast, Issue and Service

Pathway Analysis Showing Correlation Between Comcast, Issue and Service

Another concerning theme is issues. Using Pathway analysis, The Customer Insight Portal shows that issue most customers have with Comcast is service. This creates actionable customer insight for Comcast, which is that service is an area where Comcast can focus to gain improved customer relations.

This is only a glimpse at the data available on what customers think of Comcast for a small time period. In two months, we’ll examine the same three sources and compare responses to see if there is an improvement in feedback. Thankfully, The Customer Insight Portal delivers analysis in minutes, so the ability to compare Q3 and Q4 opinion will be straight-forward.

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A-Twitter About Sprint

Posted on October 6, 2008. Filed under: Customer Insight Portal | Tags: , , , |

Sprint, known for its lackluster customer service, recently came in last on the latest JD Power wireless service study. Its CEO has publicly voiced that Sprint is beginning new initiatives to get its customer service program back on track. To accomplish excellent customer service and identify actionable customer insights, Sprint will need to listen to its customers in all of the ways they communicate including social networks, Twitter and blogs.

Twitter, a microblogging service, serves as an immediate pulse for any company on how their customer service teams are performing. As a company, Sprint can monitor Twitter for every mention of their company to get a live stream of feedback that will be paramount to their recovery. What’s more, they can follow the lead of Frank Eliason and his Comcast team and respond to concerns in real time with official company Twitters.

Conceptual Map of Feedback on Sprint on Twitter

Conceptual Map of Feedback on Sprint on Twitter

Leximancer searched for mentions of Sprint on Twitter within 50 miles of five major cities – New York, Los Angeles, Seattle, San Francisco and Washington DC. Analyzing this data on The Customer Insight Portal allows users to identify central themes and concepts in the ways its customers are talking about Sprint on Twitter.

The Theme Hate is Closely Correlated With Feedback From NYC

The Theme Hate is Closely Correlated With Feedback From NYC

The first red flag is the theme hate, which is closely correlated to the Twitters from New York City. Users from New York City mention “I truly hate sprint right now” and “boooo sprint booo!! I hate them!!”

For Sprint, this presents an excellent opportunity to continually monitor Twitter to see if feedback improves over time and to compare feedback from month to month.

The Theme Service

The Theme Service

Service is a major theme for Sprint on Twitter. Using the Query feature on The Customer Insight Portal, we find that comments run the gamut (examples below).  The quote on Heroes that “There’s no service here.  I should have gone with Sprint” received multiple mentions showing Sprint’s product placement helped create buzz.

  • I pretended it was a joke.  Sprint service is not so good in my personal experience, though that was 6 years ago.
  • in Sprint customer service time, 1 min really means 10 mins. i’ve been on hold for 20 mins, he came back on 2 x to say 1 min, plz
  • my contract ran out in May. If not, I’d have claimed I was moving to middle of Nevada, where there’s no Sprint service.
  • “there’s no service here.  I shoulda gone with sprint”- quote on heroes.
  • Live chatting with a Sprint customer service rep. This is a nice
  • Sprint takes wireless service to the max in Baltimore ( Leslie Cauley/ USA. . http://tinyurl.com/3pfgom (expand)
  • working to save sprint customer service from going down the drain.
Sprint Launches a New Service

Sprint Launches a New Service

In addition, Sprint’s launch of the XOHM Wimax service in Baltimore showed up as a major theme speaking to the buzz the launch received.

So cutting through the noise with The Customer Insight Portal makes it easy to uncover both issues and praise—and provides an opportunity to get to specific customers to respond in an engaging way for the benefit of the brand.

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