How customer reviews can define your advertisements

Posted on November 10, 2008. Filed under: Customer Insight Portal, Leximancer, Webinar | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

In an age where the average advertisement costs thousands of dollars and requires hundreds of staff hours – and when a 30-second commercial spot during the Superbowl is nearing upwards of $3 million dollars – companies need to ensure that their ads are being put in the right place and at the right time.

Not every company needs a Superbowl commercial to hit their target audience. Consumers can be reached through so many outlets – including the Internet. With hundreds of review sites like Amazon, Buzzillions, CNET, etc. that contain hundreds of trustworthy reviews from consumers that use your product or services, companies can use this information to gain actionable customer insight and allow themselves to target their advertisements appropriately.

In Leximancer’s most recent Webinar, this notion was discussed. While analyzing reviews on a Canon camera lens from both Amazon and Buzzillions, The Customer Insight Portal was able to identify key issues and themes relating to reviews from each site. When comparing reviews from both, you could see that consumers on Amazon had much different opinions than those on Buzzillions.

Map highlighting the common themes and concepts from Amazon reviews

Map highlighting the common themes and concepts from Amazon reviews

While one set of reviews focused on the more technical aspects of the lens, the other focused on accessories and general features. Ultimately, it would make sense for Canon to tailor to these consumers accordingly – placing ads on Amazon that promoted some of the more technical aspects of the lens, and focus their ads on some of the available lens accessories on Buzzillions.

By being able to take customer reviews and use text analytics to identify the common themes and concepts associated with such, Canon and companies alike can really focus and target their advertisement efforts. In turn, by focusing their ads on what customers are already speaking about, companies would likely see a greater return on investment – proving that when done right and done smart, targeted advertising efforts do pay off.

Join us for our next Webinar,  Don’t Just Monitor Social Media…Analyze and Act On It, on Wednesday, Nov. 19 at 1:00 p.m. EST for a discussion on monitoring social media and how to use what people are saying to understand why they are saying it. For more information or to register, click here.

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Did Apple get it right with the new MacBook?

Posted on October 28, 2008. Filed under: Customer Insight Portal, Leximancer | Tags: , , , , , |

When Apple launched their new line of MacBook a few weeks ago, many people were excited to see some positive changes from the outdated version still in stores. Although Apple got many rave reviews on the MacBook, not every user loved everything about the newest version.

A concept map of CNET Reviews of the Macbook

A concept map of CNET Reviews of the MacBook

Using reviews of the new MacBook from CNET, Leximancer’s The Customer Insight Portal was able to identify some of the aspects that consumers were dissatisfied with that Apple could use when they develop their newest version down the road.

A thematic summary of connected themes in the concept map

A thematic summary of connected themes in the concept map

As one can see when looking at the thematic summary The Customer Insight Portal generated, the theme “bad” is the most connected at 100%. This could mean two things. This may mean that the majority of reviewers identified the product or aspects of the product as “bad”. This also may be because many users use CNET reviews as a chance to express their concerns with the new MacBook.

Another interesting thing to note is that the theme “screen” is the most prevalent theme (48%) in terms of what is truly specific to the MacBook itself. Apple opted to use a glossy screen for the new MacBook, which garnered mixed reviews.

Concept map of the theme "screen"

Concept map of the theme "screen"

When zoning in on the screen theme, you can see that glossy and matte are prevalent concepts, as many reviewers prefer the new, glossy screens of the MacBook, while others think that having a matte screen is better. Digging into some of the textual evidence, you can see that there really are mixed feelings about the look of the screen.

“For me personally I was prepared to make the switch from PC to Mac but the 
glossy screen was a deal breaker for me.”

“I am a programmer so having a glaring screen is the real deal breaker for 
me, but the other then this the thing I really disliked about these 
computers which I have not heard anyone else mention so far is the 
sharpness across the front edge.”

“The glossy screen is supposed to make everything seen on the screen, well, 
glitter. I’ve compared a website seen on a matte screen, and on a glossy 
screen, and I must concur that, the same website on the glossy screen looks 
better in terms of aesthetics.”

“The glossy screen doesn’t bother me that much. That I could live with, and 
the flat glass surface on the screen is one of the best ideas in mobile 
computing that I have seen in years.”

“Glossy screen better than matte. (But they should’ve used Opticlear coating 
from NEC)”

“I 
have no idea why everyone suddenly went to these glossy screens. I have no 
idea what they are talking about when they say it has better colors.”

“The glossy display doesn’t bother me as 
it’s the same as my iMac’s and I absolutely love it (and don’t take my 
laptops outside all that much).”

Concept map of the themes "pad" and "worst"

Concept map of the themes "pad" and "worst"

One of the most obvious concerns for the new MacBook users was the mousepad/trackpad. While the spacious pad, made of glass may be roomier and allow for some revolutionary “gestures” similar to the iPhone, the trackpad is now buttonless, which many reviewers have found to be confusing and annoying.

As you can see, the theme pad was most closely related with the worst theme, and included concepts like horrible, sucks and disliked. This shows that for many reviewers, the trackpad was a strong source of discontent.

Close up of theme "bad"

Close up of theme "bad"

Another interesting complaint that reviewers had, as you can see around the concept bad, was the loss the of a FireWire port. Because many digital cameras and camcorders use a FireWire to load onto a computer and some users need it for editing purposes, reviewers were upset that the new MacBook’s did not have this capability. Although the MacBook Pro and some other higher end options do have the FireWire port, the less expensive MacBook does not.

“Removing the firewire from the low end macbook seems like a really bad move 
when you’re looking at it now. I happen to use firewire for video editing, 
but I’m not sure it’s important to most people.”

“(maybe Macs too, just 
haven’t done any research) Sure, sure, those of us in the know are aware 
that firewire is much better for HDDs and such, but the average consumer 
doesn’t know that. Most PC users use USB external drives.”

Overall, the new Apple MacBook’s got many positive reviews from sources. However, using Leximancer’s The Customer Insight Portal, we are able to hone in on some of the aspects that reviewers aren’t as pleased with. When it is time to develop the newest version of the MacBook, Apple will be able to learn from this discontent and build a new model accordingly.

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The Customer Insight Portal Reviewed on The App Gap

Posted on October 16, 2008. Filed under: Customer Insight Portal, News | Tags: , , , , |

Influential blogger Bill Ives wrote a great initial review/first impression of The Customer Insight Portal on The AppGap, an Intuit-sponsored blog and resource on the future of work and how new tools are addressing age-old challenges of organization, collaboration and creation.

Much to Ives’ amazement, the analysis in The Customer Insight Portal happens without setup and results are delivered extremely quickly. Ives will be digging into The Customer Insight Portal over the next several weeks and we look forward to his ongoing impressions.

As a bit of background, Bill Ives has worked with Fortune 100 companies for 25 years in knowledge management, portals and learning. For several years he led the Knowledge Management Practice within the Human Performance Service Line at Accenture and was an advisor to their internal knowledge management group. Currently, Ives focuses on business applications of Web 2.0 and enterprise 2.0 technology.

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